Bird of the Month of August 2020 || Fearless and Independent Seagulls

  I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason.       Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull.       For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbors and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.      The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls.       Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds.     Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.       Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were.       Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.


I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason. 


  I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason.       Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull.       For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbors and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.      The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls.       Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds.     Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.       Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were.       Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.


Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull. 



  I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason.       Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull.       For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbors and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.      The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls.       Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds.     Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.       Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were.       Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.

For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbours and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.


  I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason.       Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull.       For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbors and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.      The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls.       Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds.     Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.       Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were.       Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.


The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls. 



  I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason.       Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull.       For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbors and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.      The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls.       Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds.     Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.       Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were.       Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.

Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds. 



Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.


  I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason.       Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull.       For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbors and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.      The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls.       Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds.     Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.       Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were.       Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.


Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were. 



  I still remember when I saw my first sea-gull. It was on Pier-39 in San Francisco in 2009. And I kind of remember that it was huge. May be my memory has exaggerated the size over the years, because any of the sea gulls I have seen since haven't matched up to the sea gull I think I saw all those years ago. And I remember that the bird was quite angry too. It kept squawking at the passers-by for no apparent reason.       Wonder why I am talking about such an old incident today. It is because a new month has begun and has been our practice, we start the month by honoring our bird of the month. For birds of the months of entire year 2020, please refer to this post - Birds of the Months of Year 2020. So far we have talked about 7 birds in details. This month we cover the 8th bird, and that is Sea Gull.       For all Indians, August stands for Independence Day. Not only did India gain its freedom on 15th August, it also gained a strong sense of self and identity. While it takes time for a newly independent nation to get at ease and become self-assured as this seagull. We have come a long way and but I do hope we get to a point when we have so much self-confidence that we stop competing with our neighbors and just learn to be. Just like this seagull. With a personality like this, no wonder these birds don't care much about what people think about them.      The Great Black-Backed Seagull is the largest of all sea gulls. These seagulls have a wingspan that can reach up to 5 ft 7 in. Just imagine that! And this seagull is a fairly aggressive species. So it matches my memory of the sea gull I saw in 2009. May be I saw this gull, and since then have only seen other gulls.       Sea gulls are also fairly opportunistic. You can see them eating a variety of food and at times sneakily stealing or snatching food from people. The birds are fairly fearless and do not fear being judged. Watch the following video of birds stealing food and other items, and most of the thieves are sea gulls. Others are ravens and crows - two of the smartest birds.     Seagulls are also seen feeding on live whales, pecking at them when they breach. Seagulls have adapted well to human presence, scavenging on roadkills and stealing food from humans. While seagulls mostly steal and scavenge, yellow-footed seagulls are honing their hunting skills as well. These are intelligent birds, and I wouldn't be surprised if they usurp humans and take over the earth some time.       Apart from Seagulls near oceans, I have also seen gulls near rivers, lakes etc. There are gulls near Yamuna bridge that are seen demonstrating typical gull-like behaviour. Gulls are indeed more common than I thought they were.       Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.


Sea gulls are independent, fearless, boisterous and have a sense of humour. These are birds with more personality than many human beings I know. And definitely birds worth celebrating in our month of Independence.

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