Bird of the Month of May || The stunning, boisterous and gregarious Starlings

Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.
Brahminy Starling
This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.




Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.
Bank Mynah
Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May. 
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.
Common Mynah
The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well. 
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.
Pied Starling
In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.  
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.
Brahminy Starling
Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah. 
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.
Pied Starling
Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas. 
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.
Pied Starling
The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle. 
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.

Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's. 
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.

Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.   
Brahminy Starling  This is the beginning of a new month and we are back with our Bird of the Month, and it is none other than the resilient starlings. You may think that you haven't ever seen a starling in your life, but believe me, you have. Starlings are present everywhere, whether it is the boisterous Mynahs or the spectacular rosy starlings. So you may not know it, but you have definitely seen a starling.        Bank Mynah  Starlings, the family that Myna belongs to, are resilient birds that are flexible and and adaptable. The month of May is symbolic of this strength. Weather-wise, things have suddenly started heating up and you need to take each day as it comes. For people like me, we have already started counting down to September when weather will start cooling down again. But starlings keep cruising through. And that is why, they are our Birds of the month of May.     Common Mynah  The name starling is a little too dainty for a boisterous and noisy bird like a common mynah. Common Mynah is probably the most common of all starlings in North India. There are often seen in large murmurations (that's what a group of starlings is called) and are viciously territorial. These birds eat anything at all and have adjusted to the Urban environment quite well.     Pied Starling  In fact at some places the species is considered invasive and is thought to be capable of having a long-term impact on the environment. In Australia, these birds are considered pests. Whereas, in some countries, they are popular cagebirds because of their incredible vocal abilities. And I totally believe that. You should hear how talkative a flock of mynahs can be. The birds do pair for life, and probably keep screaming at each other all the time.      Brahminy Starling  Bank Mynah is quite similar to the common mynah, except that it has a patch of wrinkled orange skin behind its eyes, instead of the yellow one that the common mynah sports. Bank Mynah is smaller in size and has a paler plumage too. These mynahs are usually found close to waterbodies, and hence the name. Rest of the habits are very similar to those of a common mynah.     Pied Starling  Another mynah that looks similar is the Jungle Mynah, though it lacks the patch of skin around the eye. It has pale eyes and a crop of hair around its beak. It is found all over India, except for the arid areas.     Pied Starling  The name "Starling" seems quite appropriate for this quieter, delicate, and more reserved relative of the mynah - the Brahminy Starling. With long, black, hair-like plume on its head, the Brahminy Starling is the glam icon of the Mynah family. I remember seeing this bird around our home in Sarojini Nagar and wondering whether it was related to Bulbul, mostly because the bulbul too sported a cool hairstyle.       Another starling that you would have probably seen is the pied mynah. It used to be quite common even in Delhi. It has now receded to the peripheries as have other species. This mynah is marked in black and white and has a yellowish bill with a reddish base. The skin around the eye is reddish, though the patch isn't as big as the common or bank mynah's.       Then there's the strangely named rosy starling, which does not look rosy to me from any angle. What they call pink, appears pale brown to me. However, this is the starling that has recently been in news for forming some spectacular murmurations. These birds are as gregarious as the rest of the starlings, but in places are thought to be extremely beneficial for farmers because they eat insects and pests.        This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June.

This is all about starlings, we will be back again next month with the Bird of the month of June. 

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