Bird of the Month of March 2020 || Lapwings

I still remember those times from my childhood when we used to sleep on the terrace. Sometimes there would be a breeze, but at other times, it would be perfectlt still and hot. But one aspect that never changed was the call of the lapwing. Of course, at that time, I did not recognize the bird by this name. However, I remember the white ghost-like bird that would be seen circling the sky when we heard the call. It was only recently that I started recognizing the creature associated with my childhood.   March is one of the most pleasant months in the year. It is when spring is at its best, and winter flowers are putting on a show that is worthy of a grand finale. This is the time when humans are the easiest with their surroundings and complain the least. In the golden days, when we were a society that felt secure enough to sleep in the open in good weather, the shrill three-note "did-he-do-it" call of the lapwing often tore through the nights. And therefore, the Lapwing is our bird of the month of March 2020.   The lapwing that almost all of us would have seen, even though we may not recognize it, is the red-wattled lapwing. This is a large plover that is often seen in pairs around water bodies during breeding season and may form large groups during non-breeding season (winter). It's alarm call is the shrill "did-he-do-it", that is scary enough to have you jumping out of your skin.    Red-wattled lapwings are ground birds that are incapable of perching. They nest in a ground scrape laying three to four camouflaged eggs. Adults near the nest fly around, diving at potential predators while calling noisily. Their calls are indicators of human or animal movements. Their chicks immediately after hatching start following the adults around for feeding.  The red-wattled lapwing is distinctly marked with a black breast and throat and a red bill that has a black tip. The red beak extends to red wattles leading up to the eyes. It has a white patch extending from the cheeks to the belly. In flight, its black flight feathers stand out in contrast against the white wing patch. The red-wattled lapwings feed primarily on insects.  The next lapwing that we have seen is the northern lapwing. This bird is also known as the peewit or pewit, tuit or tew-it, or the green plover. It is common through temperate Eurasia. It winters further south as far as north Africa, northern India, Pakistan, and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks.   The northern lapwing breeds on cultivated land and other short vegetation habitats. The female lays 3–4 eggs in a ground scrape. Just like the red-wattled lapwing, the northern lapwing pair too defends their nest and young noisily and aggressively against all intruders, up to and including horses and cattle.  And we were also lucky enough to see the white-tailed lapwing. This is the smallest of all the lapwings we have seen and is a dainty little creature. I almost did not recognize it in the picture.   The next month we will bring you the magical hummingbirds. They are our birds of the month of April 2020. Do watch out.
Red-wattled Lapwing
I still remember those times from my childhood when we used to sleep on the terrace. Sometimes there would be a breeze, but at other times, it would be perfectly still and hot. But one aspect that never changed was the call of the lapwing. Of course, at that time, I did not recognize the bird by this name. However, I remember the white ghost-like bird that would be seen circling the sky when we heard the call. It was only recently that I started recognizing the creature associated with my childhood. 



I still remember those times from my childhood when we used to sleep on the terrace. Sometimes there would be a breeze, but at other times, it would be perfectlt still and hot. But one aspect that never changed was the call of the lapwing. Of course, at that time, I did not recognize the bird by this name. However, I remember the white ghost-like bird that would be seen circling the sky when we heard the call. It was only recently that I started recognizing the creature associated with my childhood.   March is one of the most pleasant months in the year. It is when spring is at its best, and winter flowers are putting on a show that is worthy of a grand finale. This is the time when humans are the easiest with their surroundings and complain the least. In the golden days, when we were a society that felt secure enough to sleep in the open in good weather, the shrill three-note "did-he-do-it" call of the lapwing often tore through the nights. And therefore, the Lapwing is our bird of the month of March 2020.   The lapwing that almost all of us would have seen, even though we may not recognize it, is the red-wattled lapwing. This is a large plover that is often seen in pairs around water bodies during breeding season and may form large groups during non-breeding season (winter). It's alarm call is the shrill "did-he-do-it", that is scary enough to have you jumping out of your skin.    Red-wattled lapwings are ground birds that are incapable of perching. They nest in a ground scrape laying three to four camouflaged eggs. Adults near the nest fly around, diving at potential predators while calling noisily. Their calls are indicators of human or animal movements. Their chicks immediately after hatching start following the adults around for feeding.  The red-wattled lapwing is distinctly marked with a black breast and throat and a red bill that has a black tip. The red beak extends to red wattles leading up to the eyes. It has a white patch extending from the cheeks to the belly. In flight, its black flight feathers stand out in contrast against the white wing patch. The red-wattled lapwings feed primarily on insects.  The next lapwing that we have seen is the northern lapwing. This bird is also known as the peewit or pewit, tuit or tew-it, or the green plover. It is common through temperate Eurasia. It winters further south as far as north Africa, northern India, Pakistan, and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks.   The northern lapwing breeds on cultivated land and other short vegetation habitats. The female lays 3–4 eggs in a ground scrape. Just like the red-wattled lapwing, the northern lapwing pair too defends their nest and young noisily and aggressively against all intruders, up to and including horses and cattle.  And we were also lucky enough to see the white-tailed lapwing. This is the smallest of all the lapwings we have seen and is a dainty little creature. I almost did not recognize it in the picture.   The next month we will bring you the magical hummingbirds. They are our birds of the month of April 2020. Do watch out.
Red-wattled lapwing
March is one of the most pleasant months in the year. It is when spring is at its best, and winter flowers are putting on a show that is worthy of a grand finale. This is the time when humans are the easiest with their surroundings and complain the least. In the golden days, when we were a society that felt secure enough to sleep in the open in good weather, the shrill three-note "did-he-do-it" call of the lapwing often tore through the nights. And therefore, the Lapwing is our bird of the month of March 2020. 
I still remember those times from my childhood when we used to sleep on the terrace. Sometimes there would be a breeze, but at other times, it would be perfectlt still and hot. But one aspect that never changed was the call of the lapwing. Of course, at that time, I did not recognize the bird by this name. However, I remember the white ghost-like bird that would be seen circling the sky when we heard the call. It was only recently that I started recognizing the creature associated with my childhood.   March is one of the most pleasant months in the year. It is when spring is at its best, and winter flowers are putting on a show that is worthy of a grand finale. This is the time when humans are the easiest with their surroundings and complain the least. In the golden days, when we were a society that felt secure enough to sleep in the open in good weather, the shrill three-note "did-he-do-it" call of the lapwing often tore through the nights. And therefore, the Lapwing is our bird of the month of March 2020.   The lapwing that almost all of us would have seen, even though we may not recognize it, is the red-wattled lapwing. This is a large plover that is often seen in pairs around water bodies during breeding season and may form large groups during non-breeding season (winter). It's alarm call is the shrill "did-he-do-it", that is scary enough to have you jumping out of your skin.    Red-wattled lapwings are ground birds that are incapable of perching. They nest in a ground scrape laying three to four camouflaged eggs. Adults near the nest fly around, diving at potential predators while calling noisily. Their calls are indicators of human or animal movements. Their chicks immediately after hatching start following the adults around for feeding.  The red-wattled lapwing is distinctly marked with a black breast and throat and a red bill that has a black tip. The red beak extends to red wattles leading up to the eyes. It has a white patch extending from the cheeks to the belly. In flight, its black flight feathers stand out in contrast against the white wing patch. The red-wattled lapwings feed primarily on insects.  The next lapwing that we have seen is the northern lapwing. This bird is also known as the peewit or pewit, tuit or tew-it, or the green plover. It is common through temperate Eurasia. It winters further south as far as north Africa, northern India, Pakistan, and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks.   The northern lapwing breeds on cultivated land and other short vegetation habitats. The female lays 3–4 eggs in a ground scrape. Just like the red-wattled lapwing, the northern lapwing pair too defends their nest and young noisily and aggressively against all intruders, up to and including horses and cattle.  And we were also lucky enough to see the white-tailed lapwing. This is the smallest of all the lapwings we have seen and is a dainty little creature. I almost did not recognize it in the picture.   The next month we will bring you the magical hummingbirds. They are our birds of the month of April 2020. Do watch out.
Red-wattled Lapwing
The lapwing that almost all of us would have seen, even though we may not recognize it, is the red-wattled lapwing. This is a large plover that is often seen in pairs around water bodies during breeding season and may form large groups during non-breeding season (winter). It's alarm call is the shrill "did-he-do-it", that is scary enough to have you jumping out of your skin.  
I still remember those times from my childhood when we used to sleep on the terrace. Sometimes there would be a breeze, but at other times, it would be perfectlt still and hot. But one aspect that never changed was the call of the lapwing. Of course, at that time, I did not recognize the bird by this name. However, I remember the white ghost-like bird that would be seen circling the sky when we heard the call. It was only recently that I started recognizing the creature associated with my childhood.   March is one of the most pleasant months in the year. It is when spring is at its best, and winter flowers are putting on a show that is worthy of a grand finale. This is the time when humans are the easiest with their surroundings and complain the least. In the golden days, when we were a society that felt secure enough to sleep in the open in good weather, the shrill three-note "did-he-do-it" call of the lapwing often tore through the nights. And therefore, the Lapwing is our bird of the month of March 2020.   The lapwing that almost all of us would have seen, even though we may not recognize it, is the red-wattled lapwing. This is a large plover that is often seen in pairs around water bodies during breeding season and may form large groups during non-breeding season (winter). It's alarm call is the shrill "did-he-do-it", that is scary enough to have you jumping out of your skin.    Red-wattled lapwings are ground birds that are incapable of perching. They nest in a ground scrape laying three to four camouflaged eggs. Adults near the nest fly around, diving at potential predators while calling noisily. Their calls are indicators of human or animal movements. Their chicks immediately after hatching start following the adults around for feeding.  The red-wattled lapwing is distinctly marked with a black breast and throat and a red bill that has a black tip. The red beak extends to red wattles leading up to the eyes. It has a white patch extending from the cheeks to the belly. In flight, its black flight feathers stand out in contrast against the white wing patch. The red-wattled lapwings feed primarily on insects.  The next lapwing that we have seen is the northern lapwing. This bird is also known as the peewit or pewit, tuit or tew-it, or the green plover. It is common through temperate Eurasia. It winters further south as far as north Africa, northern India, Pakistan, and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks.   The northern lapwing breeds on cultivated land and other short vegetation habitats. The female lays 3–4 eggs in a ground scrape. Just like the red-wattled lapwing, the northern lapwing pair too defends their nest and young noisily and aggressively against all intruders, up to and including horses and cattle.  And we were also lucky enough to see the white-tailed lapwing. This is the smallest of all the lapwings we have seen and is a dainty little creature. I almost did not recognize it in the picture.   The next month we will bring you the magical hummingbirds. They are our birds of the month of April 2020. Do watch out.
Red-wattled Lapwing
Red-wattled lapwings are ground birds that are incapable of perching. They nest in a ground scrape laying three to four camouflaged eggs. Adults near the nest fly around, diving at potential predators while calling noisily. Their calls are indicators of human or animal movements. Their chicks immediately after hatching start following the adults around for feeding.



The red-wattled lapwing is distinctly marked with a black breast and throat and a red bill that has a black tip. The red beak extends to red wattles leading up to the eyes. It has a white patch extending from the cheeks to the belly. In flight, its black flight feathers stand out in contrast against the white wing patch. The red-wattled lapwings feed primarily on insects.

I still remember those times from my childhood when we used to sleep on the terrace. Sometimes there would be a breeze, but at other times, it would be perfectlt still and hot. But one aspect that never changed was the call of the lapwing. Of course, at that time, I did not recognize the bird by this name. However, I remember the white ghost-like bird that would be seen circling the sky when we heard the call. It was only recently that I started recognizing the creature associated with my childhood.   March is one of the most pleasant months in the year. It is when spring is at its best, and winter flowers are putting on a show that is worthy of a grand finale. This is the time when humans are the easiest with their surroundings and complain the least. In the golden days, when we were a society that felt secure enough to sleep in the open in good weather, the shrill three-note "did-he-do-it" call of the lapwing often tore through the nights. And therefore, the Lapwing is our bird of the month of March 2020.   The lapwing that almost all of us would have seen, even though we may not recognize it, is the red-wattled lapwing. This is a large plover that is often seen in pairs around water bodies during breeding season and may form large groups during non-breeding season (winter). It's alarm call is the shrill "did-he-do-it", that is scary enough to have you jumping out of your skin.    Red-wattled lapwings are ground birds that are incapable of perching. They nest in a ground scrape laying three to four camouflaged eggs. Adults near the nest fly around, diving at potential predators while calling noisily. Their calls are indicators of human or animal movements. Their chicks immediately after hatching start following the adults around for feeding.  The red-wattled lapwing is distinctly marked with a black breast and throat and a red bill that has a black tip. The red beak extends to red wattles leading up to the eyes. It has a white patch extending from the cheeks to the belly. In flight, its black flight feathers stand out in contrast against the white wing patch. The red-wattled lapwings feed primarily on insects.  The next lapwing that we have seen is the northern lapwing. This bird is also known as the peewit or pewit, tuit or tew-it, or the green plover. It is common through temperate Eurasia. It winters further south as far as north Africa, northern India, Pakistan, and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks.   The northern lapwing breeds on cultivated land and other short vegetation habitats. The female lays 3–4 eggs in a ground scrape. Just like the red-wattled lapwing, the northern lapwing pair too defends their nest and young noisily and aggressively against all intruders, up to and including horses and cattle.  And we were also lucky enough to see the white-tailed lapwing. This is the smallest of all the lapwings we have seen and is a dainty little creature. I almost did not recognize it in the picture.   The next month we will bring you the magical hummingbirds. They are our birds of the month of April 2020. Do watch out.
Northern Lapwing


The next lapwing that we have seen is the northern lapwing. This bird is also known as the peewit or pewit, tuit or tew-it, or the green plover. It is common through temperate Eurasia. It winters further south as far as north Africa, northern India, Pakistan, and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks. 



The northern lapwing breeds on cultivated land and other short vegetation habitats. The female lays 3–4 eggs in a ground scrape. Just like the red-wattled lapwing, the northern lapwing pair too defends their nest and young noisily and aggressively against all intruders, up to and including horses and cattle.


I still remember those times from my childhood when we used to sleep on the terrace. Sometimes there would be a breeze, but at other times, it would be perfectlt still and hot. But one aspect that never changed was the call of the lapwing. Of course, at that time, I did not recognize the bird by this name. However, I remember the white ghost-like bird that would be seen circling the sky when we heard the call. It was only recently that I started recognizing the creature associated with my childhood.   March is one of the most pleasant months in the year. It is when spring is at its best, and winter flowers are putting on a show that is worthy of a grand finale. This is the time when humans are the easiest with their surroundings and complain the least. In the golden days, when we were a society that felt secure enough to sleep in the open in good weather, the shrill three-note "did-he-do-it" call of the lapwing often tore through the nights. And therefore, the Lapwing is our bird of the month of March 2020.   The lapwing that almost all of us would have seen, even though we may not recognize it, is the red-wattled lapwing. This is a large plover that is often seen in pairs around water bodies during breeding season and may form large groups during non-breeding season (winter). It's alarm call is the shrill "did-he-do-it", that is scary enough to have you jumping out of your skin.    Red-wattled lapwings are ground birds that are incapable of perching. They nest in a ground scrape laying three to four camouflaged eggs. Adults near the nest fly around, diving at potential predators while calling noisily. Their calls are indicators of human or animal movements. Their chicks immediately after hatching start following the adults around for feeding.  The red-wattled lapwing is distinctly marked with a black breast and throat and a red bill that has a black tip. The red beak extends to red wattles leading up to the eyes. It has a white patch extending from the cheeks to the belly. In flight, its black flight feathers stand out in contrast against the white wing patch. The red-wattled lapwings feed primarily on insects.  The next lapwing that we have seen is the northern lapwing. This bird is also known as the peewit or pewit, tuit or tew-it, or the green plover. It is common through temperate Eurasia. It winters further south as far as north Africa, northern India, Pakistan, and parts of China. It migrates mainly by day, often in large flocks.   The northern lapwing breeds on cultivated land and other short vegetation habitats. The female lays 3–4 eggs in a ground scrape. Just like the red-wattled lapwing, the northern lapwing pair too defends their nest and young noisily and aggressively against all intruders, up to and including horses and cattle.  And we were also lucky enough to see the white-tailed lapwing. This is the smallest of all the lapwings we have seen and is a dainty little creature. I almost did not recognize it in the picture.   The next month we will bring you the magical hummingbirds. They are our birds of the month of April 2020. Do watch out.
White-tailed lapwing
And we were also lucky enough to see the white-tailed lapwing. This is the smallest of all the lapwings we have seen and is a dainty little creature. I almost did not recognize it in the picture. 


The next month we will bring you the magical hummingbirds. They are our birds of the month of April 2020. Do watch out. 

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