The Time-Turner Series || Treasure Trove, our home away from home in Wayanad, Kerala (God's Own Country)

 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. 


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series.


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. 


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. 


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. 


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. 


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. 


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. 


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience.


 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then.

 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. 

 Most of us city dwellers dream of owning a piece of land somewhere away from the concrete jungles we live in. One way to get a taste of that kind of life is to travel. With the latest Coronavirus outbreak and how both Delhi and Kerala have been in news, has brought January 2015 back to us. This was the time when we visited Kerala. So let us turn time back to that trip and relive some of it. The Time-Turner series is my opportunity to pen down the lingering memories and impressions of a place I have visited. It helps me relive the experience a bit and also reflect upon the aspects of the place that stood out the most to me. For more Time-Turner posts, follow this link: The Time-Turner Series. The Treasure Trove is a pretty little homestay in the midst of a coffee plantation. I remember reaching here after a  bus ride from Bengaluru. We reached an area known as the Sultan Battery late in the evening and we received ample guidance from locals and on phone from Sunil (our host). We took an autorickshaw from there to Meenangadi. I remember having a hot meal with Sunil and Reena, our hosts, while his children stayed in their rooms. At that point in time I did not know that I will become quite fond of their daughter and that she would become my student for the next one year or so. The next day, we planned a whole-day excursion and Sunil and Reena helped us plan things. Right from arranging the auto to identifying the right itinerary, they were very helpful and forthcoming with their suggestions. Language was an issue in this region, but the much-needed help was always available for us there. Reena suggested that we book an auto for the whole day for sightseeing because that would cost less as compared to hiring autos for different places. We planned for Edakkal Caves and Curuva Island. Auto for the whole day costed us 1200 Rs, which was quite reasonable. I remember that the walk to the caves was quite arduous and there was a long queue. However, it was well-managed and we also observed a unique way to manage plastic bottles. If you want to carry a water bottle, get a sticker pasted on it for 20 rs and money is refundable by the showing the bottle on you back journey. I liked this model implemented by Kerala Tourism and it worked. The Curuva Island too was very beautiful but noisy and touristy. Anyway, more about Treasure Trove. The cottage we were staying in was made of Bamboo and hay and mud, and was very pretty. It was fitted with all the basic amenities and had a balcony that overlooked the coffee plantation, which was lively with songs from various types of birds. Our mornings started on a very good note because of this. This garden around Treasure Trove huts had various plants/trees including black pepper, coffee, coconut, rubber trees, banana trees, and jackfruit trees etc. These were the coffee beans growing on the coffee trees around Treasure Trove. These bunches of coffee fruits look awesome around green plantations. We tried to taste these beans and found that they were quite bitter. Sunil also had a small rubber production unit in the farm house. Some workers come to collect raw material and create rubber sheets. All around Treasure Trove, there were several walks that we undertook. It was quite an experience. Treasure Trove had well-maintained lawns around the huts and we spent good time sitting there. After our morning walks, we used to sit here for sometime. Wi-Fi was also available at Treasure Trove but it could only be used around the dining region and not in the huts. 3G connection was also not working well inside the huts, but that was not a big deal for anyone who is on vacation. However, all this was 5 years back and I am sure things have changed since then. Before leaving for Bamboo village, we took a round of Treasure Trove and realized that most of the veggies are grown in kitchen garden except potatoes and onion, which come from Karnataka. They also have a waste management unit that is very well utilized by the homestay. In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again.

In this climate, when travel is prohibited and we are almost forced to stay in and avoid socializing, all these memories help cheer you up. You know that once this Coronavirus scare is behind us, we can start planning our travels once again. 

Comments

Shrinidhi Hande said…
What is the last picture? Leather? Mango?
Hey Shrinidhi - These rubber sheets created out of raw liquid collected from rubber trees. More on - https://phototravelings.blogspot.com/2015/01/rubber-what-goes-behind-making-of-one.html

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