Non-Avian Creatures at Bharatpur || Keoladeo National Park is not just about the birds


Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
African Queen

Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. 



Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
Spotted Deer
This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.



Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
Indian Peacock Butterfly


The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. 
Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
Yellow Orange-tip
I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. 
Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
African Queen
I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. 


The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. 

Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
Spotted Deer
Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. 
Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
Indian Roofed Turtle


This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. 

Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats

From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat.  Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. 
Let's be honest - Keoladeo National Park isn't really known for its non-Avian fauna. However, that said, there is plenty of that too inside the sanctuary. In fact leopard sightings too were reported from the park till as recently as 2017 even though this big cat was wiped off this park by 1964. Leave alone a leopard, in 2010 a tiger made its way to the sanctuary, all the way from Ranthambore. This tiger, T-7, was inside the park for almost four months before it was tranquilized and packed off the Sariska. Spotted Deer. This just goes to show that however tame Keoladeo National Park may seem, you must still always be at your guard. I wish we had known this before we took the road less travelled inside the sanctuary. But that is a tale for another time. For now lets talk about all the interesting non-avian fauna one can hope to come across inside the Keoladeo National Park.Indian Peacock Butterfly. The park has a variety of butterflies. These little creatures, along with the songbirds, make the park come alive. However, it is a really difficult job to click them, especially if you do not have a pro camera. They hardly sit still for even a second. The one above is an Indian Peacock Butterfly, easily identified by the eye-like patterns on their wings. If you search for Peacock butterfly, you will find such a wide variety of butterflies that it may confuse you. The fact that varieties of this butterfly are found all the way from Europe to Japan speaks for the sheer variety that can easily be spotted around you. Yellow Orange-tip. I absolutely love butterflies. There were several years when I believed that butterflies too, like sparrows, had abandoned Delhi, but then they found their way back. And I am so glad for that. Now you can see the greenish-white cabbage butterflies flitting about. And you can also often see the Blue Mormon finding its way through the bushes. This pretty butterfly above is the Yellow Orange-tip which is a common one in the plains. African Queen. I have often wondered what it is about the butterflies that makes them so unique. Their colorful wings of course. But also that they are so harmless and benign. Their only job in this world, apart from pollinating the flowers, is to make the world prettier. I still remember one instance in Dhanachuli, Uttarakhand, when we spotted a flutter of tiny white butterflies hanging out around a bush. I simply held out my hand to them and one of these little creatures came and sat on my palm. It was the most exquisite feeling. It was as if I had been blessed by mother nature. I am not sure what we human beings have done to deserve sharing the world with these lovely creatures. The butterfly above is a common sight in the northern plains in India and is called the African Queen or the African Monarch. It is a largish butterfly when compared to the other two pictured in this blog. Spotted Deer. Among the Ungulates, we were able to spot the spotted deer. And they were kind of spread out throughout the jungle. They calmly sat beside the much more popular migratory birds and didn't seem to mind being ignored. Other ungulates that can be spotted in Keoladeo National park are the blackbuck, Sambhar deer and Nilgai. However, we weren't fortunate enough to see them. Indian Roofed Turtle. This is the Indian Roofed Turtles and this pair lay for hours on this outcrop sunning themselves. It is indeed a pleasure to observe these animals in their natural habitat. There are six other species of turtles living in the Keoladeo National Park. Indian Softshells and Indian Flapshells are just two of them. Though we were not lucky enough to spot them. However, we were happy with our one turtle sighting. Bi-colored leaf-nosed bats. From a distance they looked like fruit hanging from a tree, but on closer inspection, they turned out to be bats. This particular variety was the Indian roundleaf one, and it has a fascinating black-brown coat. Look at how peaceful these creatures of night look in the photograph above. The way they fold their wings to shield their eyes from sunlight definitely reminds one of Count Dracula. But don't worry. They will not seek you for the fresh blood flowing in your veins. These bats are insectivorous and the only risk you run if you come too close to them is that they can bite you and kill you with rabies. Well, if you think of it, that actually sounds worse than losing a bit of blood. So keep safe distance. Feral Cattle. Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi.
Feral Cattle
Over the years, cattle too has found their way into the park and made it their home. You can see many of them loitering around the wetlands, getting irritated by the presence of migratory birds, and chasing them away. These cattle look very much at home in their wild surroundings and can be trusted to protect themselves if need be. These cattle have survived alongside predators such as the spotted hyena, an occasional, unwelcome visitor such as a tiger or a leopard, and also pesky meat-eaters such as Golden Jackal. So I guess they have earned their place in the wild. 

Other non-avians one can hope to see at Keoladeo National Park, which we didn't see, are wild boar, indian porcupine, mongoose, jungle cat, fishing cat, palm civet, otters, pythons, snakes, foxes etc. So there is a lot too be seen here in this small place so close to Delhi. 

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