Help us identify these birds we saw at Bharatpur || Birds of Keoladeo National Park

We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird. Common Sandpiper? I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad. Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill? From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me.  Juvenile Purple Sunbird? This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it.
Juvenile Purple Sunbird?

We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. 


This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird.

We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird. Common Sandpiper? I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad. Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill? From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me.  Juvenile Purple Sunbird? This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it.
Common Sandpiper?
I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad.  

We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird. Common Sandpiper? I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad. Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill? From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me.  Juvenile Purple Sunbird? This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it.
Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill?
From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. 
We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird. Common Sandpiper? I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad. Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill? From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me.  Juvenile Purple Sunbird? This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it.

Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. 

We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird. Common Sandpiper? I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad. Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill? From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me.  Juvenile Purple Sunbird? This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it.
This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. 
We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird. Common Sandpiper? I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad. Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill? From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me.  Juvenile Purple Sunbird? This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it.
About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me. 
We tried our best. We did research before the trip, and also spent hours searching the internet and our copy of Birds of India. But we were still not able to establish the identity of a few birds. It may be because the photograph was too unclear or the bird was too quick or may be because it had its back towards us. In some cases, the photographs are clear, but we still aren't sure of the identity of a few birds. We would be very grateful, if you could help us with these remaining birds. It would set our minds at ease. This bird was hopping around in low thorny bushes and making tiny peeps. VJ tried to chase it for quite some time, but this was the only picture that he managed. The bird is facing away from us and its head is in the shade. But one can make out orange brown body and an orange vent or may be the lower body. This was a tiny bird. Common Sandpiper? I am nearly sure that this is a Common Sandpiper, but the beak looks slightly different, longer may be. It was perched near the wetlands and didn't move much. What I find surprising is that the birds that are named "Common Something..." are not so common anymore. Consider the Common Sparrow for example. It is definitely sad. Some kind of a swift? Or a Robin? Or a Silverbill? From the shape of the head and the wings, this bird appears to be some type of a swift. Or However, I may be wrong. We just caught a glimpse of this. From the bill, it appears to be the Silverbill. And by the way it holds its tail up, it seems to be a Robin. I am not sure. In fact I am totally confused. So kindly help solve this dilemma. Another bird I have seen for the first time. At first I thought it was some bird of prey. But it does not seem to be. It looks like it is a Hawk Cuckoo, commonly known as the papeeha. And in some areas and languages, the Brain Fever Bird, because of its call that sounds like "Brain Fever" to some people. But on closer inspection, it looks different from a hawk cuckoo. This one may be a red-vented bulbul, though in this photograph, neither the red vent, nor the crest on the head is visible. However, I have seen pictures similar to this bird on the internet that have been captioned as the Red-Vented Bulbul. Anyway, the bird looks awfully familiar otherwise as well. Please help identify. About this bird, I am quite confident that it is an Oriental Magpie-Robin, the female of the species. This bird was perched on a tree just outside our cottage at our resort, the Sunbird and singing continuously. I am so glad I was able to capture this picture. It came out quite clear, so the bird is easier to identify. However, if I am wrong, please correct me.  Juvenile Purple Sunbird? This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it.
Juvenile Purple Sunbird?
This seems to be a Purple Sunbird, Juvenile Male, which has just started growing its breeding plumage. A sunbird can typically be identified by its thin, long beak. Full-grown males are usually the easiest to identify. If this is indeed a Juvenile Purple Sunbird, this is the first time I saw one. Would appreciate if you could help confirm. 

Thanks to all our readers for reading this far. Some posts from Keoladeo are yet to come. Believe me, we haven't yet talked about the most famous residents of the park. So please expect at least a couple of posts about birds and a couple about the park itself and our experience of it. 

Comments

Shrinidhi Hande said…
lots of catches- best wishes with ID

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