A multi-tiered waterfall of it's own kind || Seven Sisters Waterfalls, Gangtok, Sikkim



There are several magnificient waterfalls in Sikkim and the Seven Sister waterfall is one of them. Located around 32 kilometers from Gangtok, this waterfall is easily accessible from the Gangtok-Lachung highway. When we drove past these waterfalls, it was still summer and the water was comparatively less, but it is said that during the rains, these waterfalls are a sight to see.   From a distance from certain points each of the seven different waterfalls is visible, falling almost parallel to each other, down the rugged face of the mountain. Some of the falls turn to almost a trickle in the summer, while others hide behind the rocks, but overall, the falls are worth a stop and some photos even at the driest times.   During monsoon, you can spend more time here. Anyways, we feel Sikkim is a place you should go with loads of time on your hands, because there's a risk that you will fall in love with a small town or a city and would want to spend more time there. We tried to be flexible during our trip and it works.   When we were on our trip, we met several people simply because we were riding the public transport most of the time. Among the people we met was a Russian national who had taken up a job in Infosys in Hyderabad and had been staying here for several years simply because he wanted to see India and what could be better if you could do it while getting paid well. Sikkim is the ideal place for such a guy, because he takes long vacations from his company and usually visits a place with the intention of exploring it. He had arrived in Gangtok and rented a very cheap hotel so that he could stay longer. And he would plan each day as it came.   It is these kinds of people who would get the most from visiting a place like Sikkim. But a majority of tourists in Sikkim are families. We found several of them at Seven Sister Waterfalls as well. They usually come here on a tight schedule and leave after the quintessential selfies with their feet dipped in the pool. Nothing wrong with that of course. It is anyways very difficult to really experience anything when it is too crowded. To each his/her own.   Tourists do not visit the Seven Sisters Waterfalls in isolation. They usually stop here on their way to somewhere else. It is usually a circuit. Along with the Seven Sisters Waterfalls, people visit hilltop temples known as Hanuman Tok and Ganesh Tok, the Himalayan Zoological park where you can see the red panda. People also stop on their way to look at Banjhakri waterfall and the Bakthang Waterfalls. Tourists also flow in and out of the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology. It is usually a full-day circuit. We also did something of the sort on a taxi we shared with the Russian.   The best time to visit the falls is during the monsoons when the falls are mighty and unstoppable. If you have time on your hands, you can sit around and soak in the sights, may be take a much needed break from a hectic touristy schedule.





























There are several magnificent waterfalls in Sikkim and the Seven Sister waterfall is one of them. Located around 32 kilometers from Gangtok, this waterfall is easily accessible from the Gangtok-Lachung highway. When we drove past these waterfalls, it was still summer and the water was comparatively less, but it is said that during the rains, these waterfalls are a sight to see.




From a distance from certain points each of the seven different waterfalls is visible, falling almost parallel to each other, down the rugged face of the mountain. Some of the falls turn to almost a trickle in the summer, while others hide behind the rocks, but overall, the falls are worth a stop and some photos even at the driest times. During monsoon, you can spend more time here. 


Anyways, we feel Sikkim is a place you should go with loads of time on your hands, because there's a risk that you will fall in love with a small town or a city and would want to spend more time there. We tried to be flexible during our trip and it works.



There are several magnificient waterfalls in Sikkim and the Seven Sister waterfall is one of them. Located around 32 kilometers from Gangtok, this waterfall is easily accessible from the Gangtok-Lachung highway. When we drove past these waterfalls, it was still summer and the water was comparatively less, but it is said that during the rains, these waterfalls are a sight to see.   From a distance from certain points each of the seven different waterfalls is visible, falling almost parallel to each other, down the rugged face of the mountain. Some of the falls turn to almost a trickle in the summer, while others hide behind the rocks, but overall, the falls are worth a stop and some photos even at the driest times.   During monsoon, you can spend more time here. Anyways, we feel Sikkim is a place you should go with loads of time on your hands, because there's a risk that you will fall in love with a small town or a city and would want to spend more time there. We tried to be flexible during our trip and it works.   When we were on our trip, we met several people simply because we were riding the public transport most of the time. Among the people we met was a Russian national who had taken up a job in Infosys in Hyderabad and had been staying here for several years simply because he wanted to see India and what could be better if you could do it while getting paid well. Sikkim is the ideal place for such a guy, because he takes long vacations from his company and usually visits a place with the intention of exploring it. He had arrived in Gangtok and rented a very cheap hotel so that he could stay longer. And he would plan each day as it came.   It is these kinds of people who would get the most from visiting a place like Sikkim. But a majority of tourists in Sikkim are families. We found several of them at Seven Sister Waterfalls as well. They usually come here on a tight schedule and leave after the quintessential selfies with their feet dipped in the pool. Nothing wrong with that of course. It is anyways very difficult to really experience anything when it is too crowded. To each his/her own.   Tourists do not visit the Seven Sisters Waterfalls in isolation. They usually stop here on their way to somewhere else. It is usually a circuit. Along with the Seven Sisters Waterfalls, people visit hilltop temples known as Hanuman Tok and Ganesh Tok, the Himalayan Zoological park where you can see the red panda. People also stop on their way to look at Banjhakri waterfall and the Bakthang Waterfalls. Tourists also flow in and out of the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology. It is usually a full-day circuit. We also did something of the sort on a taxi we shared with the Russian.   The best time to visit the falls is during the monsoons when the falls are mighty and unstoppable. If you have time on your hands, you can sit around and soak in the sights, may be take a much needed break from a hectic touristy schedule.



When we were on our trip, we met several people simply because we were riding the public transport most of the time. Among the people we met was a Russian national who had taken up a job in Infosys in Hyderabad and had been staying here for several years simply because he wanted to see India and what could be better if you could do it while getting paid well. Sikkim is the ideal place for such a guy, because he takes long vacations from his company and usually visits a place with the intention of exploring it. He had arrived in Gangtok and rented a very cheap hotel so that he could stay longer. And he would plan each day as it came. It is these kinds of people who would get the most from visiting a place like Sikkim. 

But a majority of tourists in Sikkim are families. We found several of them at Seven Sister Waterfalls as well. They usually come here on a tight schedule and leave after the quintessential selfies with their feet dipped in the pool. Nothing wrong with that of course. It is anyways very difficult to really experience anything when it is too crowded. To each his/her own.

There are several magnificient waterfalls in Sikkim and the Seven Sister waterfall is one of them. Located around 32 kilometers from Gangtok, this waterfall is easily accessible from the Gangtok-Lachung highway. When we drove past these waterfalls, it was still summer and the water was comparatively less, but it is said that during the rains, these waterfalls are a sight to see.   From a distance from certain points each of the seven different waterfalls is visible, falling almost parallel to each other, down the rugged face of the mountain. Some of the falls turn to almost a trickle in the summer, while others hide behind the rocks, but overall, the falls are worth a stop and some photos even at the driest times.   During monsoon, you can spend more time here. Anyways, we feel Sikkim is a place you should go with loads of time on your hands, because there's a risk that you will fall in love with a small town or a city and would want to spend more time there. We tried to be flexible during our trip and it works.   When we were on our trip, we met several people simply because we were riding the public transport most of the time. Among the people we met was a Russian national who had taken up a job in Infosys in Hyderabad and had been staying here for several years simply because he wanted to see India and what could be better if you could do it while getting paid well. Sikkim is the ideal place for such a guy, because he takes long vacations from his company and usually visits a place with the intention of exploring it. He had arrived in Gangtok and rented a very cheap hotel so that he could stay longer. And he would plan each day as it came.   It is these kinds of people who would get the most from visiting a place like Sikkim. But a majority of tourists in Sikkim are families. We found several of them at Seven Sister Waterfalls as well. They usually come here on a tight schedule and leave after the quintessential selfies with their feet dipped in the pool. Nothing wrong with that of course. It is anyways very difficult to really experience anything when it is too crowded. To each his/her own.   Tourists do not visit the Seven Sisters Waterfalls in isolation. They usually stop here on their way to somewhere else. It is usually a circuit. Along with the Seven Sisters Waterfalls, people visit hilltop temples known as Hanuman Tok and Ganesh Tok, the Himalayan Zoological park where you can see the red panda. People also stop on their way to look at Banjhakri waterfall and the Bakthang Waterfalls. Tourists also flow in and out of the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology. It is usually a full-day circuit. We also did something of the sort on a taxi we shared with the Russian.   The best time to visit the falls is during the monsoons when the falls are mighty and unstoppable. If you have time on your hands, you can sit around and soak in the sights, may be take a much needed break from a hectic touristy schedule.



Tourists do not visit the Seven Sisters Waterfalls in isolation. They usually stop here on their way to somewhere else. It is usually a circuit. Along with the Seven Sisters Waterfalls, people visit hilltop temples known as Hanuman Tok and Ganesh Tok, the Himalayan Zoological park where you can see the red panda. People also stop on their way to look at Banjhakri waterfall and the Bakthang Waterfalls. Tourists also flow in and out of the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology. It is usually a full-day circuit. We also did something of the sort on a taxi we shared with the Russian. 


The best time to visit the falls is during the monsoons when the falls are mighty and unstoppable. If you have time on your hands, you can sit around and soak in the sights, may be take a much needed break from a hectic touristy schedule.

If you liked this post and found it helpful, I would request you to follow these things when traveling - 

1. Manage your waste well and don’t litter Use dustbins.
2. Tell us if you went to a place and found it hard to locate a dustbin. 

3. Avoid bottle waters in hills. Usually you get clean water in hills and water bottles create lot of mess in our ecosystem. 

4. Say big no to plastic and avoid those unhealthy snacks packed in plastic bags. Rather buy fruits. 

5. Don't play loud blaring music in forests of jungle camps. You are a guest in that ecosystem and disturbing the locals (humans and animals) is not polite

Comments

Sandeepa said…
The waterfall sure looks lovely. "Come with lots of time in hand", is like telling us some for a month at least to Sikkim! Never been there, soon hopefully!
Also, really like those last few lines you have put here, so important.

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