Museo Camera - A Temple of Photography in India and One of the World's Largest Camera Museum built by multi talented & passionate Aditya Arya

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space. 

Address: 

MUSEO CAMERA
Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002
Gurgaon, Haryana 122001
M: +91 8287814216

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

This Camera museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet. And let me highlight that Mr Aditya Arya has done lot of research about how to architect this scape and that makes him special, as whatever he does he puts lot of hard-work & believes in perfection in executing his ideas. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras. Museo Camera, a vintage camera museum, showcases analogue cameras from over a century long period, grown out of the personal collection of visual historian and celebrated photographer, Aditya Arya.

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they? 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary. 

Above photograph is clicked in one of the Two vintage-style studios, which let you take pictures.

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

The above photograph is of an original ad that Mr Arya got from a newspaper. Note that the word "photograph" is missing. This is because the word wasn't coined back then. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

We are really grateful to Mr Arya, who took time out today to take us around the museum himself. It was definitely a very engaging tour. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Last year I visited The Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago city and the visit to Museo camera reminded me of that visit. Both of these museums are so grands an curated so well. One of the commons feelings I had was - I didn't want to leave the space and wanted to see each masterpiece for hours to understand them well & uncover stories behind them.  

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

After coming from Museo Camera, I did some research about other Camera Museums across the world and whatever I could find, Museo Camera seemed most interesting to me and I would not be surprised if it's World's largest camera museum. And at the pace this museum is seeing more cameras coming in, it would soon be a challenge for Mr Arya and team to find space for keeping them in galleries. During this search, I found this interesting list of Top Photography Museums in the World. I will wait for the day when Museo Camera would start getting listed in international lists of Camera/Photography museum and I am sure that time is not far. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

The Photography Museums mentioned in above link are -


1. Foam – Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 
2. The Museum of Contemporary Photography – Chicago, USA. 
3. The International Center of Photography – New York, USA. 
4. Lianzhou Museum of Photography – Lianzhou, China. 
5. Fotomuseum Winterthur – Winterthur, Switzerland.  
6. The Photographers’ Gallery – London, UK. Of course, we can’t forget London. 
7. Les Douches Gallerie – Paris, France. 
8. Thessaloniki Museum of Photography – Thessaloniki, Greece. 
9. Portuguese Center of Photography – Porto, Portugal. 

10. Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography – Tokyo, Japan. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Above photograph shows a section of Museo Camera, which has different kinds of light-meters and tell a very interesting story about how light-meters evolved over many decades. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

There is an elaborate section on Stereoscopes and also explains about history of these beautiful equipments. "Stereoscope is a device for viewing a stereoscopic pair of separate images, depicting left-eye and right-eye views of the same scene, as a single three-dimensional image.

A typical stereoscope provides each eye with a lens that makes the image seen through it appear larger and more distant and usually also shifts its apparent horizontal position, so that for a person with normal binocular depth perception the edges of the two images seemingly fuse into one 'stereo window'. In current practice, the images are prepared so that the scene appears to be beyond this virtual window, through which objects are sometimes allowed to protrude, but this was not always the custom. A divider or other view-limiting feature is usually provided to prevent each eye from being distracted by also seeing the image intended for the other eye." - Some details about Stereoscope from wikipedia. Check out more in details on link mentioned above. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Above photograph shows some of the famous Sinar cameras inside Museo Camera in Gurgaon and one of these Sinar Cameras is owned as well as used by Aditya Arya himself. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Museo Camera has few galleries on first and second floor of the museum. When we were at the museum, there were few shows going on and the space is available to host your exhibitions. Hopefully I will be able to create something meaning to host  exhibition at Museo Camera. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Above photograph showcases galleries on each floor and I loved the way all these spaces are used to well with so colourful photographs. The interiors of Museo camera are designed very well to make this space utilised well for photography exhibitions. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

There is also a library in Museo Camera. One can sit here and read various photography books available in Museo Camera library in Gurgaon. That's such a wonderful place inside this Photography Camera museum in Gurgaon, India. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Above photograph shows section of Museo Camera where some of the unique photographs from pre-independence era are being showcased. These are from archives of Kulwant Roy and a section which is must visit in this huge Museum full of cameras & photography equipments. This section of Museo Camera is located on top floor of the museum. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Above photograph is clicked from top-most floor of Museo Camera - A museum of photography cameras. Apertures, flashlights, tripods, lenses & lot of are placed so well around various sections telling unimaginable stories. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

That's how Museo Camera website shares about the space - "Museo Camera is spread over 18,000 sq. ft. of built space set on .75 acres of land, with the ability to accommodate up to 200 visitors at a time. Besides housing a unique collection of vintage cameras and Photographic equipment, The Museum also has gallery spaces for curated events, teaching facilities, studios for workshops, seminar rooms, a multi-media resource centre a library, a cafe and a Museum shop that retails among other things, rare Photographic memorabilia."

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Let me share a pro tip - When you are Museo Camera, make sure you meet the man behind this wonderful place for photographers and artists. Aditya Arya comes to the museum almost everyday, although I would request you to be considerate. Aditya Arya is one of the most inspiring persons I have met and there are always lot of great things to learn from conversations with him. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Conde Nast Traveler magazine covered this place and mentioned Museo Camera as Asia's largest collection of cameras

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

When you are at Museo Camera in Gurgaon, take a bite at 'Fig at Museo' cafe. A brilliant space created with amazing aromas on ground floor. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

The ground floor of 'Museo Camera' museum has galleries showcasing the journey of camera from its invention to the present day through some very well chosen artefacts from different parts of the globe. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Above photograph shows front part of Museo Camera in Gurgaon and the huge canvas on the front is from one of the famous photo collection of Museo Camera, which is titled as 'People of India'. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Aerial and spy cameras used in the WWI and WWII, the world’s oldest 3D camera and the smallest camera made with a prism can be found in Museo Camera. And it's not limited to camera but lot more than that. Museo Camera environment nurtures creativity and helps the new generation respect the craft of photography & much more than that. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

There is this wall at the entry of the Museo Camera museum in Gurgaon and it lists names of all contributors, who helped in some way to build this museum. Proud to see my name in the wall of fame at Museo Camera. I know so many of these contributors who showed confidence in conviction and vision of Mr Aditya Arya. 

A visit to Museo Camera, a museum dedicated to the history of cameras and photography, was long pending. Ever since it opened in the beginning of this year, VJ and I had talked often about it. Museo Camera, India's first not-for-profit, crowd-funded Center for Photographic Art, is an inspiring story in itself. Aditya Arya's years of hard work, dedication, and passion to the field of photography have culminated in the creation of this magical space.   The museum, earlier located in the basement of Aditya Arya's home, has now shifted to this beautiful building that is a fine specimen of strong, industrial architecture. Built around a mesh of sturdy, exposed iron beams, the museum is a sight to behold. And we have not even started talking about the content yet.   Located in one of the prime addresses of Gurgaon, DLF Phase 4, Museo Camera houses over 1500 cameras and 100s of other photography equipment such as apertures, light meters, artificial lighting equipment from various eras and was created through citizen funding. One of the most remarkable galleries in the museum is the one that covers the history of photography spanning across more than 200 years and a history of cameras.   The gallery starts with a prototype of Camera Obscura. The word Camera Obscura is latin and literally means the dark room. Mr Arya told us the that the word Camera was earlier spelled with a "K". So it was "Kamera". The urdu word "kamra" probably has the same origin. Languages are really interesting, aren't they?   Anyhow, the original Camera Obscura used to be as large as a room. The one in the Museum is a small box just to demonstrate how the original equipment used to work. Basically the basis is a natural optical phenomenon known as the pinhole image. When a scene outside a tent or a wall is projected on the otherside through a small opening, it appears reversed. This kind of a projection was earlier used for creating sketches and to study solar eclipse without damaging the eyes.   Then you come across the founding fathers of photography - Nicéphore Niépce, Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre, Sir John Hershel, and Louis Daguerre. You start with how Niepce created the first photograph and then learn about Dagerreotype, the photography technique created by Louis-Jacques Mande Daguerre. You find out how photography was so named, and then how the art of creating negatives was developed to ensure that photographs could be reproduced.   You walk along a huge wall that talks about the history of photography and the major contributors. Not only do you learn about the dates and pioneering companies such as Kodak, you also see several original photographs clicked by some very old cameras. You find out about photographers who have made significant contributions to the world of photography.   If you look closely, you will also find treasures such as original old advertisements and how they have evolved. You come across cameras of various shapes and sizes. You also see a hint of how studios were set up earlier. Another interesting fact that Mr Arya shared with us was about the portraits that were clicked during Victorian times. Mr. Arya has sourced them from auctions, flea markets, etc over the years.   If you have seen some of these portraits you would notice the lack of smiles and a passive expression in the subjects. The reason for that was that at those times, since aperture was very small, the exposure needed to be larger and as a result slightest of movements would blur the images. Therefore subjects were asked to strike a natural pose that would be easy to hold for 15 seconds or so.   The ground floor houses this interesting gallery and a shop from where you can buy mementos. There's also a cafe, called "fig at museo" that serves some delicious looking food, which we were unfortunately not able to sample today. But it looks like a cool and relaxed space.   The first floor houses exhibition halls where currently the Aravalli series is on display. Photographers can rent the space for their exhibitions here. It is a fairly large space and the infrastructure too is good. The place also gets good footfall from the right kind of audience.   The second floor has a classroom/conference hall where one can organize workshops or talks or other events. Apparently, there are four such spaces in the building. There's also a small library here where you can sit and read. You cannot rent out the books yet. That is still being figured out. In this space, amateur photographers can also put their work up for display and even sell it to walk-in customers.   Apart from this all, there's an amazing sign here that says "Photography is strictly allowed". It is such a warm and friendly place. Coming to the ticketing aspect of it, you need to pay Rs 200 per person, unless you are a founding member. We became founding members during the initial rounds of crowd sourcing. You can still become one. The information is available at the front desk.   Mr Aditya Arya has always been an inspiring person for us. We have followed his journey as a photographer very closely. Apart from that, we also visited his farm in the Aravallis where he has built a stone cottage all by himself. He was also at the helm of the Aravalli exhibition that was an attempt to put forth the plight of the Aravalli Ecosystem. And now Museo Camera. Mr Arya says that he is always working on something in parallel that may convert into something substantial in the long run. I think that is what sets him apart. And that is what makes him a visionary.    MUSEO CAMERA Shri Ganesh Mandir Marg, DLF Phase IV, Sector 28, Gurugram, Haryana 122002 Gurgaon, Haryana 122001 M: +91 8287814216

Do check out the video below where Aditya Arya shares his journey into Photography and how he spent his 40 years in various kinds of photography along many of his interests like farming and environment conservator.  

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